Including Original "Paul H. Letters" Copyright © 1996-2017 Paul V. Heinrich - All rights reserved.



Thursday, 30 March 2006

Part2: Professor Rejects Meteor Theory of Carolina Bays' Origin

Part2: Professor Rejects Meteor Theory of Carolina Bays' Origin

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 29 14:53:22 EST 2006

Susan Web wrote:

“Their key mysterious features are their
number (half a million of them), their
regularity of form, their common
orientation, their extreme shallowness,
their low rim heights.”

Their “common orientation” is not as consistent as the
proponents of an impact origin falsely claim them to be.
In the southern and northern ends of their distribution,
the long axis of Carolina Bays actually show a wide
range of orientations, which fails to support either an
air-burst or impact origin. Within the middle range of
their distribution, the orientation of the Carolina Bays
are consistent with Pleistocene paleowind directions as
determined from ancient dune fields, loess distribution
patterns, and paleoclimate models. I would find it quite
remarkable that either a meteorite or comet would take
the time and trouble to plan its impact as to perfectly
coincide with the prevailing winds at the time it hit like
an airplane landing at an airport. The wide spread of
orientations at the northern and southern ends of their
distributions is also consistent with what is known about
the variability of Pleistocene paleowind patterns over
time.

Another and major problem, which the proponents of either
an impact or air-burst origin is that the shape, orientation,
and depth of the Carolina Bays have been altered by over
a 100,000 years of modification by eolian and lacustrine
processes. For example, Ivester et al. (2003) found that
the multiple sand rims found within Big Bay in South
Carolina become progressively younger towards the center
of this Carolina Bay. In this case, Optically Stimulated
Luminescence (OSL) dates from sand rims starting from
the outer rim to the inner rim produced a perfectly
chronologically consistent set dates of 35,660±2600;
25,210±1900; 11,160±900; and 2,150±300 years BP. In
this case, the Big Bay has shrunk by 1.6 km over the last
36,000 years, with rims being produced about 36,000 BP,
25,000 BP, 11,000 BP, and 2,000 BP as it shrunk. If a
person wants to argue that these sand rims are of impact or
air-burst origin, they need to explain how either impacts or
air-bursts managed to precisely excavate tens of thousand
of years apart sucessive craters in precise center of Big Bay
and similar Carolina Bays and with ever decreasing energy
as to produce sand rims of smaller and smaller diameter,
which are nicely nested within each other.

Their nothing mysterious about these rims as (Ivester et al.
2004a) studied the sedimentology and stratigraphy of these
rims and found them to be “composed of both shoreface
and eolian deposits". Eolian and lacustrine processes are
perfectly capable of producing the low rims processes by
Carolina Bays. The low rims can be easily explained by a
combination of eolian and lacustrine processes.

As a result of the OSL dating of the rims of numerous Carolina
Bays, Ivester et al (2004b) concluded:

"The optical dating results indicate that
present-day bay morphology is not the
result of a single event, catastrophic
formation, but rather they have evolved
through multiple phases of activity and
inactivity over tens of thousands of years.
This is evidenced both by multiple rims
of differing ages along the same bay, and
by multiple ages within single rims."

Because the Carolina Bays have been modified for over a
100,000 years by both eolian and lacustine processes, their
form, orientation, shallowness, and sand rims are useless as
evidence of how they were originally created.

References Cited:

Ivester, A.H., Godfrey-Smith, D. I., Brooks, M. J., and
Taylor, B. E., 2003, Concentric sand rims document the
evolution of a Carolina bay in the Middle Coastal Plain
of South Carolina. Geological Society of America
Abstracts with Programs. vol. 35, no. 6, pp. 169.

Ivester, A. H., Godfrey-Smith, D. I., Brooks, M. J., and
Taylor B. E., 2004a, The timing of Carolina Bay and
inland activity on the Atlantic coastal plain of Georgia
and South Carolina. Geological Society of America
Abstracts with Programs. vol. 36, no. 5, p. 69

Ivester, A. H., Godfrey-Smith, D. I., Brooks, M. J., and
Taylor B. E., 2004b, Chronology of Carolina bay sand
rims and inland dunes on the Atlantic Coastal Plain, USA.
The 3rd New World Luminescence Dating Workshop. July
4 - 7, 2004, Department of Earth Science, Dalhousie
University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Mrs. Webb also wrote:

“It is also worth noting that all the
geological theories of their origins
are based on the erroneous notion
that the Carolina Bays are all to be
found in only one type of geological
terrain, the coastal plains. But they
have since been found in other terrain
types, which effectively rules out
most of the prior geological theories
(except for those fish fins, of course).”

Unfortunately, the only “erroneous notion” here is the
pervasive Internet folklore about Carolina Bays having
been found on a variety of geologic terrains. The fact
of the matter is that Carolina Bays are **not** found in
a diverse assortment geologic terrains. The Internet
fiction about Carolina Bays being found in a wide range
of geologic terrains was soundly refuted by the detailed
analysis, which May and Warme (1999) did of Carolina
Bays, including those found within the coastal plains of
Mississippi and Alabama. They found that these bays
are restricted to deeply weathered, very low relief, and
very poorly drained, geomorphic surfaces.

Reference Cited:

May, James H., and Warne, Andrews G., 1999, Hydrogeologic
and Chemical Factors Required for the Development of
Carolina Bays Along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Coastal
Plain, USA. Environmental Engineering and Geoscience.
vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 261-270.

The abstract for May and Warme (1999) can be found at:

http://eeg.geoscienceworld.org/cgi/content/abstract/5/3/261

Best,

Paul

Re: Professor Rejects Meteor Theory of Carolina Bays' Origin

Re: Professor Rejects Meteor Theory of Carolina Bays' Origin

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 29 10:29:52 EST 2006

Thaddeus Besedin wrote:

“Is it known if any metals associated with and
transported by meteorites have been detected
in any substantive concentrations in cores or
other samples?

Ron Baalke wrote:

http://www.thetandd.com/articles/2006/03/28/news/doc4428a99f752a6396001544.txt

No. There has not been any convincing association between
iridium or any related elements, meteorites, and the Carolina
Bays. Some of the data concerning the age of the Carolina
Bays and papers on their origin is noted in a popular article at:

http://www.hallofmaat.com/modules.php?name=Articles&file=article&sid=86

Some interesting web pages:

Abstracts by Ivester and others:

http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2002AM/finalprogram/abstract_45547.htm
http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2004AM/finalprogram/abstract_78899.htm

Luminescence dating of Carolina Bay sand rims

http://www.westga.edu/~aivester/pr01.htm

Paul

Monday, 20 March 2006

Discussion On Whether Chicxulub Impact Killed the Dinosaurs or Not

Discussion On Whether Chicxulub Impact Killed the Dinosaurs or Not

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Sun Mar 19 23:31:59 EST 2006

Chicxulub discussion page

Welcome to the Chicxulub discussion page

This page contains discussion related to Keller, Adatte &
Stinnesbeck's article, The Non-Smoking Gun.
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/template.cfm?name=NSG2349857238495
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/template.cfm?name=NSG1
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/template.cfm?name=NSG93854738475347
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/template.cfm?name=NSG999999

RE: Article on paleo-Bolide porduced tsunamites/seismites

RE: Article on paleo-Bolide produced tsunamites/seismites

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Sun Mar 19 23:30:29 EST 2006

jonee (Elton) asked:

"Anyone have a link as to specifically what tsunamites
and seismites are defined as?"

There is a definition of "tsunamite" in:

Shanmugam, G., 2006, The Tsunamite Problem. Journal
of Sedimentary Research. vol. 76. DOI: 10.2110/jsr.2006.073

http://www.colorado.edu/geolsci/jsedr/Abstracts/may2006/ShanmugamAbs.pdf
http://www.colorado.edu/geolsci/jsedr/Abstracts/may2006/jsr76-5.html

The above abstract stated:

"The genetic term tsunamite is used for a potpourri
of deposits formed from a wide range of processes
(overwash surges, backwash flows, oscillatory flows,
combined flows, soft-sediment deformation, slides,
slumps, debris flows, and turbidity currents) related
to tsunamis in lacustrine, coastal, shallow-marine,
and deep-marine environments."

Although they are called "Tsunami Sand Deposits", pictures
of coastal plain "tsunamites" created by the December Indian
Ocean Tsunami can be seen in:

"The December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami: Initial
Findings on Tsunami Sand Deposits, Damage, and
Inundation in Sri Lanka" at:

http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/tsunami/srilanka05/tsunami_sand_deposit.html
http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/tsunami/srilanka05/sand.html

and in "Tsunami deposits (figure 3: thickness of the deposits)" at:

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/raphael.paris/tsunami.htm

Another coastal tsunami deposit (tsunamite) from the
1929 Grand Banks Earthquake found at Taylor's Bay on
Newfoundland's southern coast can be seen at:

http://www.seismo.nrcan.gc.ca/damage/1929/1929tuttleresearch.php

A definition of "seismite" can be found in "Developing a Classification
Scheme for Seismites" by Stephen F. Greb at:

http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2002NC/finalprogram/abstract_32750.htm

This abstract for the 2002 North-Central Section (36th) and
Southeastern Section (51st), Geological Society of America Joint
Annual Meeting stated:

"The term "seismite" is presently used for many features and
deposits of inferred seismic origin, each of which requires
varying types and amounts of data to support a seismic
interpretation."

One type of seismite is sediment that show disturbance /
deformation, while it was still soft, caused by the ground
shaking, which accompanies an earthquake. Some pictures
of seismites can be found in "The Late Triassic seismite
in Northern Ireland, southwest England and south Wales" at:

http://www.habitas.org.uk/larne/assortedseismites.html

A related article might be:

Walkden, G., J. Parker, and S. Kelley, 2002, A Late Triassic
Impact Ejecta Layer in Southwestern Britain. Science. vol. 298,
no. 5601, pp. 2185-2188. DOI: 10.1126/science.1076249
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/298/5601/2185

The Entrada Sandstone contains soft sediment deformation
features, which are argued to be impact-related seismites.
This is discussed in:

Alvarez, W., E. Staley, D. O'Connor, and M. A. Chan, 1998,
Synsedimentary deformation in the Jurassic of southeastern
Utah: A case of impact shaking? Geology. vol. 26, no. 7,
pp. 579-582.

http://eps.berkeley.edu/~platetec/125.pdf

a press release can be found at:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981006073850.htm

Best

Paul

Saturday, 18 March 2006

Astronomers Map Earliest Evidence of Big Bang

Astronomers Map Earliest Evidence of Big Bang

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri Mar 17 19:52:43 EST 2006

New Three Year Results on the Oldest Light in the Universe
http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_or/PressRelease_03_06.html
and http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_mm.html

Microwave map of the sky can be found at:
http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_ig/060917/CMB_ILC_PolMap150bk.png

Time Line of the Universe
http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_ig/060915/CMB_Timeline150.jpg

Other articles:

New Satellite Data On Universe's First Trillionth Second
Science Daily, Johns Hopkins University, March 17, 2006
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/03/060316181253.htm

Astronomers Find the Earliest Signs Yet of a Violent Baby Universe
By DENNIS OVERBYE, New York Times, March 17, 2006
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/17/science/space/17cosmos.html

New Images Support 'Big Bang' Theory
Washington Post, by Guy Gugliotta, March 17, 2006
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/16/AR2006031601889.html
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/16/AR2006031601889_pf.html

Re: Large Impact Crater Off the Coast of Antarctica

Re: Large Impact Crater Off the Coast of Antarctica

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri Mar 17 17:05:41 EST 2006

Ron Baalke wrote:

"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4816794.stm
Space impact clue in Antarctica By Paul Rincon
BBC News, March 17, 2006"

A couple of relevant published papers are:

Published papers on this alleged crater are:

Hrjanina, L. P., 1998, Once Again about Kainozoic Meteorite Structures
in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Lunar and Planetary Science XXIX,
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/LPSC98/pdf/1152.pdf

Gerard-Little, P., D. Abbott, D. Breger, and L. Burckle, 2006, Evidence
for a Possible Late Pliocene Impact in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Lunar
and Planetary Science XXXVII.
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2006/pdf/1399.pdf

Another paper is:

Khryanina, L. P.,1985, Possible meteorite impact structures in the
Ross Sea, Antarctica. International Geology Review. vol. 27, no. 10,
pp.1207-1211.

Yours,

Paul

Thursday, 16 March 2006

RE: Desert Varnish formation

RE: Desert Varnish formation

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 15 17:09:53 EST 2006

Kevin Forbes wrote:

“Desert Varnish formation
http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ploct97.htm”

A couple of related references are:

Quade, Jay, 2001: Desert pavements and associated
rock varnish in the Mojave Desert: How old can they
be?. Geology. vol. 29, no. 9, pp. 855–858.

and

Broecker, W. S., and Liu. T., 2001: Rock Varnish:
Recorder of Desert Wetness?. GSA Today. vol. 11,
no. 8, pp. 4–10.
doi: 10.1130/1052-5173(2001)011<0004:rvrodw>2.0.CO;2

The PDF version of Broecker and Liu (2001) can
be downloaded from:

http://www.gsajournals.org/pdfserv/10.1130%2F1052-5173(2001)011%3C0004:RVRODW%3E2.0.CO%3B2

http://www.gsajournals.org/gsaonline/?request=get-abstract&doi=10.1130%2F1052-5173(2001)011%3C0004:RVRODW%3E2.0.CO%3B2

Reassembly of the above URLs might be needed. If you do not paste
the full URLs into your browser, a message incorrectly stating that
you will need to buy the GSA Today article will appear.

Best Regards,

Paul

How to Discover Asteroid Impacts

How to Discover Asteroid Impacts

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 15 17:06:20 EST 2006

How to discover asteroid impacts
The story of the discovery of two impact craters
By Emilio González, March 13, 2006
http://www.astroseti.org/impacts.php

Wednesday, 15 March 2006

RE: Desert Varnish formation

RE: Desert Varnish formation

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Mar 14 10:34:13 EST 2006

Kevin Forbes wrote:

“Desert Varnish formation
http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ploct97.htm”

A couple of related references are:

Quade, Jay, 2001: Desert pavements and associated
rock varnish in the Mojave Desert: How old can they
be?. Geology. vol. 29, no. 9, pp. 855–858.

and

Broecker, W. S., and Liu. T., 2001: Rock Varnish:
Recorder of Desert Wetness?. GSA Today. vol. 11,
no. 8, pp. 4–10.
doi: 10.1130/1052-5173(2001)011<0004:rvrodw>2.0.CO;2

The PDF version of Broecker and Liu (2001) can
be downloaded from:

http://www.gsajournals.org/pdfserv/10.1130%2F1052-5173(2001)011%3C0004:RVRODW%3E2.0.CO%3B2

http://www.gsajournals.org/gsaonline/?request=get-abstract&doi=10.1130%2F1052-5173(2001)011%3C0004:RVRODW%3E2.0.CO%3B2

Reassembly of the above URLs might be needed.

Best Regards,

Paul

Wednesday, 8 March 2006

Strange Newspaper Headline About Meteorites

Strange Newspaper Headline About Meteorites

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Mar 8 14:30:22 EST 2006

Dear Friends,

Jay Leno's Tonight Show showed a headline about meteorites,
which you-all might appreciate. It can be seen at:

http://www.nbc.com/nbc/The_Tonight_Show_with_Jay_Leno/headlines/H_3095/26.shtml#headline

Yours,

Paul