Including Original "Paul H. Letters" Copyright © 1996-2017 Paul V. Heinrich - All rights reserved.



Wednesday, 28 November 2007

Meteorite Shale

Meteorite Shale

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Nov 28 13:11:20 EST 2007

Ron asked:


>I see some Meteorites for sale, especially the

>Willamette Meteorite, listed as Meteorite Shale.

>What exactly is Meteorite Shale?


It is a term used for a highly weathered (terrestrialized) meteorite.
The use of “shale”, I suspect, came from the tendency of some
highly weathered meteorites, specifically highly oxidized iron
meteorites to develope a layered structure as they weather and
break into subparallel / parallel layers like shale when broken.

The terms “shale balls” and “iron shale” is also used for
some highly weathered meteorites.

When Meteorites Get Old
http://www.meteorite-times.com/Back_Links/2005/January/Meteorite_of_Month.htm

Yours,

Paul H.

Wednesday, 21 November 2007

Another Possible crater? - Additional Note

Another Possible crater? - Additional Note

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Nov 21 09:12:04 EST 2007

This is an additional note to:

http://six.pairlist.net/pipermail/meteorite-list/2007-November/040163.html

In http://six.pairlist.net/pipermail/meteorite-list/2007-November/039955.html
Jerry wrote:

"This is copied from the article that you supplied
herein:

"We will defiantly let you know the outcome of the
research," they said.

Seems there's been quite of few of those threats on
the List this year. Maybe things will calm down to
normal next year and folks will get back to just
nicely reporting the facts."

http://www.havredailynews.com/articles/2007/06/11/local_headlines/local.txt "

A detailed geologic map and description of the
geology of the region of the "Bender Crater"
can be found in:

Knechtel, M. M., 1959, Stratigraphy of the Little Rocky
Mountains and encircling foothills, Montana. United
States Geological Survey Bulletin no. 1072-N, pp.
723-752.

This publication and map can be downloaded from:

http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/usgspubs/b/b1072N

http://onlinepubs.er.usgs.gov/djvu/B/bull_1072_n.djvu

http://onlinepubs.er.usgs.gov/djvu/B/bull_1072_n_plt.djvu

Yours,

Paul H.

Tuesday, 20 November 2007

Another Possible crater?

Another Possible crater?

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Nov 20 23:08:04 EST 2007

Jerry wrote:

"This is copied from the article that you supplied
herein:

"We will defiantly let you know the outcome of the
research," they said.

Seems there's been quite of few of those threats on
the List this year. Maybe things will calm down to
normal next year and folks will get back to just
nicely reporting the facts.”

http://www.havredailynews.com/articles/2007/06/11/local_headlines/local.txt "

The origin of these features was discussed back in
June. There are some really nice geological maps,
which show this feature to be a domal uplift, which is
only one of a number of laccoliths and other igneous
intrusions. It is just one of several circular features
of igneous origin that occur locally.

Go look at

http://six.pairlist.net/pipermail/meteorite-list/2007-June/035664.html

There I stated:

"Using information given in the article, I used Google
Earth to find the the location of the structure, which
it discusses. The latitude and longitude of this
structure is:

108.6729941879148 W

47.82294379843308 N

It is on the edge of hills known as "The Little Rocky
Mountains". There a number of circular structure
within the region associated with laccolithic intrusions.

There is a discussion of this in "Geology and Physiography
of Fort Belknap" at:

http://serc.carleton.edu/research_education/nativelands/ftbelknap/geology.html

http://serc.carleton.edu/images/research_education/nativelands/ftbelknap/crosssection.gif

The "Geologic Map of the Zortman 30' x 60' Quadrangle,
Central Montana" can be downloaded from:

http://www.mbmg.mtech.edu/stmap.htm

and http://www.mbmg.mtech.edu/pdf_100k/zortman.pdf

Two publications on the geology of the area are:
Knechtel, M.M., 1944, Oil and gas possibilities of the
plains adjacent to the Little Rocky Mountains, Montana:
U.S. Geological Survey, Oil and Gas Investigations
Map OM-4, scale 1:48000.

Knechtel, M.M., 1959, Stratigraphy of the Little Rocky
Mountains and encircling foothills, Montana: U.S.
Geological Survey, Bulletin 1072-N, scale 1:48000.”

Best Regards,

Paul

Monday, 12 November 2007

Rosetta gravity assist flyby

Rosetta gravity assist flyby

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Mon Nov 12 16:18:54 EST 2007

Sterling K. Webb wrote:


>There's something re-assuring about the notion

>that we could detect a "potential impactor,"

>even if we didn't immediately recognize that

>it's one of ours!


There is a discussion, which expresses similar
thoughts, of Rosetta, AKA "2007 VN84", in:

That's no near-Earth object, it's a spaceship
By Emily Lakdawalla, Nov. 9, 2007, http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001227/

Yours,

Paul H.

Friday, 9 November 2007

Post-Cretaceous/Tertiary Impact Ammonites Found in New Jersey

Post-Cretaceous/Tertiary Impact Ammonites Found in New Jersey

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri Nov 9 08:48:45 EST 2007

Rethinking What Caused the Last Mass Extinction
by John Noble Wilford, November 6, 2007, New
York Times.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/06/science/06fossil.html?ref=science

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/06/science/06fossil.html?pagewanted=1&ei=5070&en=4d31bafcd36b6bfb&ex=1195016400&emc=eta1

“On previous visits, they had found in the Pinna
rock and soil a surprising number of marine fossils,
including small clams, crabs and sea urchins. There
was an abundance of ammonites, considered index
organisms of the uppermost Cretaceous
environment. Somehow, here at least, life appeared
to have not only persisted but also flourished for
tens, perhaps hundreds, of years after the putative
asteroid impact.”

Yours,

Paul H.

Tuesday, 6 November 2007

Question about Polarizing Microscope Lomo Polam P-211

Question about Polarizing Microscope Lomo Polam P-211

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Nov 6 14:31:15 EST 2007

On Novemeber 5, 2007 and in "Question about Polarizing
Microscope Lomo Polam P-211", Pat Brown asked:

“Can any of you help me learn anything more about
this microscope? I contacted the good folks at Lomo
USA and they tell me that this microscope was never
supported in the US market and that they can offer
no help or support. I am appealing to the international
members of this list for any help they might be able
to offer.”

A good place to ask this question is the Yahoo Microscope
Group at:

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Microscope/

There are 2300 members in this group, many of whom
are experts at obtaining second- and third-hand manuals
and parts of microscopes. Also, there is a lot expertise
on this list with petrographic / polarizing microscopes.

Best Regards,

Paul H.