Including Original "Paul H. Letters" Copyright © 1996-2017 Paul V. Heinrich - All rights reserved.



Sunday, 31 August 2008

ATTN : Hurricane Gustav Evacuation

ATTN : Hurricane Gustav Evacuation

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Sun Aug 31 00:51:35 EDT 2008

Dave Carothers wrote:

"Best of luck, Mike. Having been stationed at Keesler
AFB in Biloxi, I know what you are going through.
God speed."

Some quotes:

"The mother of all storms." and "This is the storm of the century."
- Mayor Ray Nagin.

"This is as worst as it can get." - Gov. Bobby Jindle

They are now predicting that Gustav will be a Category 4 (and
possibly even 5 at times) Hurricane with 15 to 20 foot storm
surge. The coastal areas and parishes are going to get hammered
very, very badly if the predictions come true. In Baton Rouge,
we will definitely be with out power for days at least. The
only saving grace is that being in the northwest side of the
hurricane, the wind will blow any trees in our yard away from
the house if they should fall. Just as long as there are not
any tornadoes, we should be able to ride out what looks to be
a rather rough sleigh ride on Monday. I and Irina have all
of our supplies, money, full tank of gas in both of our cars,
and so forth. Now all we can do is wait and make the remainder
of the preparations. It feels like what it would be like to
know that a medium-size meteorite was headed toward a part
of Earth near me.


>From the looks of it, this will be worst than either Katrina,

Rita, or Andrew, which I have all been through here and from
what I have heard of it, at least either as bad as or worse
than Betsy even as far inland as Baton Rouge, LA.

People are "getting out of Dodge City".

Hurricane Gustav Evacuees Make Way To Chicago
http://cbs2chicago.com/local/hurricane.gustav.hurricane.2.806975.html

Then there is this:

Gustav's potential storm surge could inundate Houma
http://www.dailycomet.com/article/20080830/ARTICLES/808309944/1212&title=Gustav_s_potential_storm_surge_could_inundate_Houma

Gustav could send a 25-foot wall of water into Terrebonne,
Lafourche, meteorologist says
http://www.dailycomet.com/article/20080830/HURBLOG/808300293&title=Gustav_could_send_a_25_foot_wall_of_water_into_Terrebonne__Lafourche__meteorologist_says

Best regards,

Paul

Tuesday, 26 August 2008

Acraman Corrections and Bunyeroos

Acraman Corrections and Bunyeroos

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Aug 26 17:29:40 EDT 2008

Sterling K. Webb wrote:

“Don't ask me what a Bunyeroo is... Maybe a relative of
the Bunyip?”

Your guess is as good as mine. :-) :-)

Whatever a Bunyeroo might be, there is a gorge and creek
in the Flinders Ranges of South Australia named after it.

A brief description of the geology, including the Acraman
impact bed exposed in Bunyeroo George can be found in:

Webb, G. 2005. The geology of Bunyeroo, Brachina, and
Parachilna Gorges. In: (eds.) Aikman, A., Lilly, K., Célérier,
J., Kovács, I., and Estermann, G., An excursion guide to the
Flinders Ranges, South Australia, Journal of the Virtual
Explorer, Electronic Edition, ISSN 1441-8142, Volume 20,
Paper 2.

http://virtualexplorer.com.au/journal/2005/20/webb/

Tsunamis and super-hurricanes after the Acraman
asteroid impact

http://www.pir.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/11108/mj39_tsunamis_acraman.pdf

Flinders Ranges National Park Bunyeroo and Wilcolo Creeks Hike

http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/parks/pdfs/BUNYEROO_WILCOLO_HIKE.PDF

Yours,

Paul H.

Downloadable Paper and web Page about Scandinavian Impact Structures

Downloadable Paper and web Page about Scandinavian Impact Structures

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Tue Aug 26 13:36:48 EDT 2008

There is online a paper about Scandinavian impact
structures, which can be downloaded for free. It is:

Dypvik, H., J. Plado, C. Heinberg, E. Hakansson, L. J.
Pesonen, B. Schmitz and S. Raiskila, 2008, Impact
structures and events – a Nordic perspective. Episodes.
vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 107-114.

It can be downloaded from

http://www.episodes.org/backissues/33igc/15%20Impact%20%20structures-r.pdf

The link to this paper and table of contents for the issue
of Episodes containing it can be found at:

http://www.episodes.org/backissues/33igc/33igc.htm

Also, there is "Store runde strukturer i norsk natur" at:

http://www.geo.uio.no/groper/

Yours,

Paul H.

Monday, 18 August 2008

Meteorite impact structures: the good and the bad

Meteorite impact structures: the good and the bad

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Mon Aug 18 09:15:01 EDT 2008

While looking for something else I came across a general article
about impact structures. It is:

Osinsk, G. R., 1999, Meteorite impact structures: the good and
the bad. Geology Today. vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 13-19.

The PDF file is at:

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/119400823/PDFSTART

The abstract is at:

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119400823/abstract

Yours,

Paul H.

Sahara Paleoclimate was "When the Sahara was wetter (relevant to your interests)"

Sahara Paleoclimate was "When the Sahara was wetter (relevant to your interests)"

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Mon Aug 18 00:09:02 EDT 2008

David Garrison wrote:

" http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f79/bougainvillea1/Relevant_to_interests_hedgehog.jpg

How wet and for how long and how recently the Sahara
was wet of course is a determining factor in the ages
of the older Saharaian meteorites. (of course the 1,000
years ago is an error on the part of the article writer

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26203952/

Remains of cemetery found in Sahara A thousand
years ago, the now-barren desert was moist and
green By Randolph E. Schmid updated 6:28 p.m.
ET, Thurs., Aug. 14, 2008"

The dissication of the Sahara Desert is discussed in
"Climate and environmental history of the Sahara: the
last 6000 years" by Dr.Patrick Honecker at:

http://www.pressoffice.uni-koeln.de/1651+M5f856bfc5ae.html

He states:

"The results of this work document a progressive drying
of the regional terrestrial ecosystem between 5600 and
2700 years ago, in response to gradually decreasing
tropical monsoon rainfall. This drying followed a logical
ecological sequence starting with tropical grassland trees
and herbs being replaced by typical Sahel vegetation,
followed by loss of grass cover and establishment of
the modern desert plant community that is largely
restricted to oases."

and

"In summary, this new environmental reconstruction from
within the Sahara proper strongly contrasts with the
generally accepted hypothesis that the ‘green Sahara’
which existed between 10,000 and ~6000 years ago had ended
abruptly."

The paper ("work") discussing the paleoclimatology of the
Sahara Desert is:

Francus, P., J.-P. Cazet, M. Fagot, B. Rumes, J. M. Russell,
F. Darius, D. J. Conley, M. Schuster, H. von Suchodoletz, and
D. R. Engstrom, 2008 Climate-Driven Ecosystem Succession in
the Sahara: The Past 6000 Years. Science. vol. 320, no. 5877,
pp. 765-768.

The abstract to this paper can be found at:

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/320/5877/765
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18467583?dopt=Abstract

Their paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the pollen from a
continuous core covering 6000-year from northern Chad indicates
a "progressive drying of the regional terrestrial ecosystem"
that resulted in strong reductions in tropical trees and then
Sahelian grassland cover" and "large-scale dust mobilization"
starting about 4300 calendar years before the present. They
concluded that "today's desert ecosystem and regional wind
regime were established around 2700 calendar years before
the present."

A PDF file of this paper can be found at:

http://www.old.uni-bayreuth.de/departments/geomorph/docs/Kroepelinetal_2008.pdf

A discussion of this paper can be found in "Study:
Sahara Gradually Dried Up Over 6,000 Years" at:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=90289718

Another recent paper about the paleoclimatology of the
Sahara Desert is;

Bubenzer1, O., and H. Riemer, 2007, Holocene Climatic
Change and Human Settlement Between the Central Sahara
and the Nile Valley: Archaeological and Geomorphological
Results. Geoarchaeology, vol. 22, no. 6, 607–620.

For the eastern Sahara, they conclude:

"The evidence derived from archaeological excavations and
surveys coupled to nearly 500 14C dates (Figure 2) suggests
that the Holocene wet phase lasted from approximately
9500–6000 B.P. (9000–5000 cal. B.C., calibration: dispersion
calibration program, Cologne 2001, www.calpal.de). After
the hyper-arid Pleistocene, the tropical summer rain front
moved about 700–1000 km northward (e.g., Haynes, 1987;
Neumann, 1989a; Pachur and Hoelzmann, 2000), which
initiated more humid conditions in the Eastern Sahara."

Notice that the Pleistocene before 9,500 BP was hyper-arid
and the "wet" Sahara was only from 9500–6000 B.P.

An interesting web page on this topic is "Africa During the
Last 150,000 Years" by Jonathan Adams at:

http://www.esd.ornl.gov/projects/qen/nercAFRICA.html
http://www.esd.ornl.gov/projects/qen/new_africa.html
http://www.esd.ornl.gov/projects/qen/refs.html

This is what he has to say about the Sahara:

"(dates in Guo et al are given in 14C years ago on the
left, approximate calibrated of 'real' dates are given
on the right)

Moist 9,500-8,200 14C ya (10,400-9,100 ya)
Slight drying 8,200-8,000 14C ya (9,100-8,900 ya)
Moist 8,000-7,000 14C ya (8,900-7,900 ya)
Moderately dry 7,000-5,700 14C ya (7,900-6,500 ya)
Moist 5,700-4,000 14C ya (6,500-4,500 ya)
Very dry - as dry as at present - 4,000-3,800 14C ya (4,500-4,100 ya)
Slightly moister than present 3,800-3,500 14C ya (4,100-3,700 ya)
After 3,500 14C ya (3,700 ya). Remaining about as dry as at present"

Yours,

Paul H.

Sunday, 17 August 2008

Russian Sikhote Aline Meteorite Film

Russian Sikhote Aline Meteorite Film

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Sun Aug 17 23:14:32 EDT 2008

Dear Friends,

While looking for something else, I came across the below Russian
meteorite film in the Library of Congress Cataloge.

"THE SIKHOTE ALINE METEORITE (1956) FEA 1315-16
Central Documentary Film Studio 35mm
Dir: I. Gradov, Consultant: V. Fesenkov

A well-photographed documentary film on the scientific
investigation of the Sikhote Aline Meteorite that fell in Siberia in
1947. Print is in good shape, with one splice. Probably of most
interest to specialists, either in meteorology or those interested in
Soviet scientific methods in the late 1940s.

English track."

http://www.loc.gov/rr/mopic/findaid/russian.html

Yours,

Paul H.


Thursday, 14 August 2008

It came from the sky: school rock an ancient meteorite (Australia)

It came from the sky: school rock an ancient meteorite (Australia)

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Thu Aug 14 23:05:57 EDT 2008

It came from the sky: school rock an ancient meteorite
by Dimity Barber, Berwick leader, August 14, 2008

http://www.berwickleader.com.au/article/2008/08/13/41154_blv_news.html

The first few sentences states:

"CLYDE Primary School has been rocked by news it is the
custodian of a 4.5 billion-year-old meteorite.

Principal Maurie Richardson said the school had received word from Museum Victoria that an 85kg rock now on display at the school is a fragment of Cranbourne’s world-famous meteorite shower."

...rest of text omitted...

More Photographs of Meteorite

http://tools.leadernewspapers.com.au/photo_galleries/gallery.php?id=1375

Yours,

Paul H.

Wednesday, 13 August 2008

Articles on Impact Caused "megatsunami chevrons" and URL Correction

Articles on Impact Caused "megatsunami chevrons" and URL Correction

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Aug 13 23:59:48 EDT 2008

First, I found a couple of very interesting articles about the
alleged "'megatsunami chevrons", which are argued to have
been caused by megatsunamis by Dallas Abbott (at Lamont
Doherty Earth Observatory) and her co-workers. The articles
are:

1. Some questions about the 'megatsunami-chevrons' at
http://zsylvester.blogspot.com/2008/03/some-questions-about-megatsunami.html

and 2. Some questions about the 'megatsunami chevrons':
addendum at:

http://zsylvester.blogspot.com/2008/05/some-questions-about-megatsunami.html

in addition, one of the URLs does not work in my last post,
"[meteorite-list] Re Here We Go Again About Terminal
Pleistocene Impact" at:

http://six.pairlist.net/pipermail/meteorite-list/2008-August/046160.html

The URL for "States and Stability of Climate System", PDF file,
should be:

http://www.iac.ethz.ch/education/bachelor/climate_systems/notizen/Climate-States-and-Stability.pdf

It discusses the Younger Dryas.

Yours,

Paul H.

Re Here We Go Again About Terminal Plesitocene Impact

Re: Here We Go Again About Terminal Pleistocene Impact

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Aug 13 23:21:14 EDT 2008

In http://six.pairlist.net/pipermail/meteorite-list/2008-August/046148.html ,
Darren Garrison noted the article “Comet strike would be cataclysmic” at:

http://www.thisiswesternmorningnews.co.uk/news/Comet-strike-end-world-scenario/article-265193-detail/article.html

The article states:

“Fiery debris from the comet also melted
huge portions of the ice sheet, which
drastically altered the planet's climate.
Massive volumes of fresh water found
their way into the oceans and changed
their currents, plunging the Earth into
an Ice Age for 1,000 years.”

It is interesting to note that Dyke (2004) made a detailed study of
the deglaciation of North America. As a part of this study, he
constructed and published in this paper a series of detailed
paleogeographic maps showing the extent of ice starting at 18,000
C14 BP and ending at 5,000 C14 BP. for time periods ranging from
500 to 100 years.

From calculating ice volumes using these paleogeographic
maps Dyke (2004) states:

“The world’s largest ice sheet complex lost
<10% of its area prior to 14 ka BP. It then
retreated nearly linearly until 7 ka BP, by
which time only 10% of the area remained
more glaciated than today. This linear
reduction of area, as currently understood,
was interrupted by two events: a reduced
rate of recession during the later half of the
Younger Dryas, and an increased rate as ice
was clearing from Hudson Bay (Fig. 5).
These events are clearer when plotted on
the calendar time scale, because the
radiocarbon time scale abbreviates the
duration of the impact of the Younger Dryas
effect in North America (Fig. 5b).”

At the beginning of the Younger Dryas, Dyke (2004) shows a lack
of any abrupt increase in the retreat (melting) of the North American
ice sheet. So far, the proponents of this theory have provided a
single shred of evidence that massive melting of the ice sheets, as
described in the newspaper article, actually occurred.

There is significance evidence of the discharge of large amounts
of freshwater from either Lake Agassiz, the melting of the Keewatin
ice dome, or combination of both sufficient to shut down
thermohaline circulation within the Atlantic Ocean, i.e. Alley (2000),
Broecker (2003), and Tarasov and Peltier (2006). The water
contained by Lake Agassiz was already there and was simply
released, not created, abruptly.

References:

Alley, R.B., 2000, The Younger Dryas cold interval as
viewed from central Greenland. Quaternary Science
Reviews. vol. 19, no. 1-5, pp. 213-226.

Broecker, W.S., 2003, Does the Trigger for Abrupt
Climate Change Reside in the Ocean or in the Atmosphere?
Science. vol. 300, pp. 1519-1522.

Dyke, 2004 A.S. Dyke, An outline of North American
deglaciation with emphasis on central and northern Canada.
In: J. Ehlers and P.L. Gibbard, EDS., pp. 373–424,
Quaternary Glaciations—Extent and Chronology, Part II
vol. 2b, Elsevier, Amsterdam.

Tarasov , L., and W.R. Peltier, 2005, A calibrated deglacial
drainage chronology for the North American continent:
evidence of an Arctic trigger for the Younger Dryas.
Quaternary Science Reviews. vol. 25, pp. 659–688

Also, look at:

States and Stability of Climate System, PDF file at:

http://www.iac.ethz.ch/education/bachelor/climate_systems/notizen/Climate-States-and-Stability.pdf.

The newspaper article also stated:

“It left no impact crater but sparked the
biggest wildfires in history, which stretched
across the continent and suffocated humans
and animals with overwhelming amounts
of soot and smoke, leaving the few survivors
with no vegetation or prey to live on.

The just published paper, which I mention in my previous post
comments on this claims. The paper is;

Buchanan, B., M. Collard, and K. Edinborough, 2008,
Paleoindian demography and the extraterrestrial impact
hypothesis. Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences. Published online before print August 12,
2008, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0803762105

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2008/08/11/0803762105.abstract

They noted:

"Given that the ET impact is proposed to have
occurred north of the Great Lakes, if the trough
represents a population decline, there should be
significantly fewer Paleoindian radiocarbon dates in
northern latitudes during the second time period
compared with the first and third time periods.
This is not the case."

They concluded:

"The results of our analysis are consistent with recent
comments by Pinter and Ishman (13) and Haynes (14).
Pinter and Ishman reject Firestone et al.’s (1) claim
that there was a devastating ET impact north of the
Great Lakes at 12,900+/-100 calBP."

and

“The results of the analyses were not consistent
with the predictions of extraterrestrial impact
hypothesis. No evidence of a population decline
among the Paleoindians at 12,900 ± 100 cal BP
was found.”

Note:

"Pinter and Ishman (13)" = Pinter, N., and S. E. Ishman, 2007,
Impacts, mega-tsunami, and other extraordinary claims. GSA
Today. vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 37-38.

http://www.gsajournals.org/archive/1052-5173/18/1/pdf/i1052-5173-18-1-37.pdf

Also look at figure 4 at:

http://www.hallofmaat.com/images/004Fig.jpg

Notice there were three major periods of rapid vegetational change
in the northeast Midwest and southeast United States as indicated
by the green lines, None of them correspond to Firestone’s
hypothesized impact. There is a complete lack of any evidence in
the paleovegetation records from numerous lake cores in these
areas for Firestone’s hypothesized impacts. Given the claims
made for the size, magnitude, and devastation of his hypothesize
impact, it is impossible for entire ecosystems to have been
devastated by continent-wide wildfires and not significantly changed
the vegetation in an abrupt manner The lack of any apparent effect
on vegetation in North America as illustrated by Jacobson et al.
(1987) grossly contradicts, if not refutes, the geopoetry, which
appears in this newspaper article, about continent-wide
devastating wildfires.

References cited:

Jacobson, George L., Jr., Webb, Thompson, III, and Grimm,
Eric E., 1987, Patterns and rates of vegetational change
during the deglaciation of North America. in W. F. Ruddiman
and H. E. Wright, Jr., eds., pp. 277-287. North America
Adjacent Oceans During the Last Deglaciation. The Geology
of North America. vol. K-3. Geological Society of America,
Boulder, Colorado.

Yours,

Paul H.

OT Humor The CERN Rap or Quantum Physicists Gone Wild :-) :-)

OT Humor The CERN Rap or Quantum Physicists Gone Wild :-) :-)

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Aug 13 16:02:20 EDT 2008

CERN Rap by Will Barras at

http://www.vimeo.com/1431471?pg=embed&sec=1431471

Yours,

Paul H.

New PNAS Paper About Firestone’s Impact Hypothesis

New PNAS Paper About Firestone’s Impact Hypothesis

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Wed Aug 13 12:44:12 EDT 2008

The paper is:

Buchanan, B., M. Collard, and K. Edinborough, 2008,
Paleoindian demography and the extraterrestrial impact
hypothesis. Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences. Published online before print August 12,
2008, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0803762105

The abstract is at

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2008/08/11/0803762105.abstract

Jaconson et al. (1987) did a study of the rate at which the
vegetation of North America changed during the last 15,000
years. They found from the examination of sevreal well-dated
and continuous paleovegetational records that there were
only three major periods of rapid vegetational change in the
northeast Midwest and southeast United States during this
time. None of them correspond to the time of Firestone’s
hypothesized impact. There is a complete lack of any
evidence of significant vegetation changes in the
paleovegetation records from numerous lake cores for
Firestone’s hypothesized impacts. These times are shown
as green lines in Figure 4 at:

http://www.hallofmaat.com/images/004Fig.jpg

Given the claims made for the size, magnitude, and
devastation of his hypothesize impact, the complete lack of
any significant effect, which can be seen the paleovegetational
records in cores from any of numerous lakes within the
Midwestern and eastern North America, as summarized
by Jaconson et al. (1987), raises the same questions about
Firestone’s hypothesis that the analysis of radiocarbon
dates by Buchanan et al. (2008) does.

References cited:

Jacobson, George L., Jr., Webb, Thompson, III, and Grimm,
Eric E., 1987, Patterns and rates of vegetational change
during the deglaciation of North America. in W. F. Ruddiman
and H. E. Wright, Jr., eds., pp. 277-287. North America
Adjacent Oceans During the Last Deglaciation. The Geology
of North America. vol. K-3. Geological Society of America,
Boulder, Colorado.
Yours,

Paul H.

Friday, 1 August 2008

Virtual Global Geologic Map to be Released to the Internet

Virtual Global Geologic Map to be Released to the Internet

Paul bristolia at yahoo.com
Fri Aug 1 09:03:42 EDT 2008

Geological mapping gets joined up by Jennifer Carpenter
Science reporter, BBC News, July 31, 2008

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7535379.stm

“The world's geologists have dug out their maps and are
sticking them together to produce the first truly global
resource of the world's rocks.”

-------

Welcome to OneGeology
http://www.onegeology.org/home.html

"OneGeology is an international initiative of the geological
surveys of the world and a flagship project of the
'International Year of Planet Earth'. Its aim is to create
dynamic geological map data of the world available via
the web. This will create a focus for accessing geological
information for everyone. Thanks to the enthusiasm and
support of participating nations the initiative has
progressed rapidly and geological surveys and the many
users of their data are excited about this ground-breaking
project. These pages provide a background to the
initiative as well as up to date information on its progress.
We invite you to explore the site and we welcome you to
OneGeology. Enjoy your visit!"

Yours,

Paul H.