Including Original "Paul H. Letters" Copyright © 1996-2017 Paul V. Heinrich - All rights reserved.



Saturday, 30 January 2010

Distribution of Canyon Diablo meteorites at Meteor (Barringer) Crater ???

Distribution of Canyon Diablo meteorites at Meteor (Barringer) Crater ???

Paul Heinrich
Sat Jan 30 00:37:45 EST 2010

Dear Friends,

Has anyone compiled and published a map showing
how the various size fragments of Canyon Diablo
meteorites were distributed by the impact around
Meteor (Barringer) Crater in Arizona? If so, what
has been inferred about the impact processes by the
distribution of Canyon Diablo meteorites around it?

Yours,

Paul H.


More on the Lorton... or Lorton hears a Who ?

More on the Lorton... or Lorton hears a Who ?

Paul Heinrich
Sat Jan 30 00:18:23 EST 2010

In
http://six.pairlist.net/pipermail/meteorite-list/2010-January/060468.html ,
Richard Kowalski wrote:

"I find the comments amusing. It's pretty obvious
that the rock belongs to the land owner, not the
doctors. I just wonder if it dawned on them
themselves or if someone contracted them about
this. I'm not even suggesting one of the dealers
mentioned in the article contacted the owner
about this, but I wouldn't be surprised if some
hunter contacted them to advise them of their
rights..."

When the fall was first reported, it struck me as being strange that
the doctors should to be claiming to be the owners when they
likely were only renting it.

In a similar vein, I noted that a person or two, who sold Park Forest
meteorites to collectors said that they found their Park Forest
meteorites in the street. In such a case, the real owners of those
meteorites would be the city of Park Forest. Nobody seemed to
question their ownership of their meteorites at that time.

In
http://six.pairlist.net/pipermail/meteorite-list/2010-January/060498.html ,
Greg Stanley about the "Hodges Meteorite Strike (Sylacauga
Aerolite)" wrote:

"On December 1, 1954, the day after Ann Hodges
was struck, he discovered a second fragment of the
meteorite in the middle of a dirt road. McKinney
was able to sell his rock to the Smithsonian for
enough to purchase a small farm and a used car."

Although at that time, people failed to pay any attention to him
having found it in a dirt road. If this dirt road was a county road,
it seems like it really belonged to the county government. If it
was a private dirt raod, it would belong the landowner, whose
raod the land was on. It seemed like in this case, McKinney got
away with "finders keepers".

I have always wondered about the case of a meteorite hitting a
house or landed on a property, for which the "owner" was still
paying off his or her mortgage. In such a case, would the mortgage
company have partial claim to the ownership of the meteorite and
debris from the impact? Would it have a say in how the meteorite
was either sold or donated and a share of the profit from any
sale of it?

Yours,

Paul H.

Sunday, 3 January 2010

Two extraterrestrial dust horizons found in the Dome Fuji ice core

Two extraterrestrial dust horizons found in the Dome Fuji ice core

Paul Heinrich
Sun Jan 3 20:31:38 EST 2010

Misawa, K., M. Kohno, T. Tomiyama, T. Noguchi, T. Nakamura,
K. Nagao, T.Mikouchi, and K. Nishiizumi, 2010, Two extraterrestrial
dust horizons found in the Dome Fuji ice core, East Antarctica. Earth
and Planetary Science Letters. vol. 289, no. 1-2, pp. 287-297.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2009.11.016

In part the abstract reads,

"Two silicate-rich dust layers were found in the Dome Fuji ice core
in East Antarctica, at Marine Isotope Stages 12 and 13. Morphologies,
textures, and chemical compositions of constituent particles reveal
that they are high-temperature melting products and are of
extraterrestrial origin. Because similar layers were found approximately
2000 km east of Dome Fuji, at EPICA (European Project for Ice
Coring in Antarctica)-Dome C, particles must have rained down
over a wide area 434 and 481 ka."

Mention is also made of these dust horizons in:

Narcisi, B., J. Robert Petit, and B. Delmonte, nd, Quaternary Science
Reviews, Article in Press, Corrected Proof

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.07.009

A related paper that is available online as a PDF fils is:

Duprat , J., C. Engrand , M. Maurette , G. Kurat , M. Gounelle ,
and C. Hammer, 2007, Micrometeorites from Central Antarctic snow:
The CONCORDIA collection. Advances in Space Research. vol. 39,
pp. 605–611.

Abstract at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2006.05.029

PDF file at:

http://www2.mnhn.fr/hdt205/leme/doc/2007%20Duprat%20et%20al.%20ASR.pdf

Yours,

Paul H.


Yardangs On Mars

Yardangs On Mars

Paul Heinrich
Sun Jan 3 12:36:16 EST 2010

Clarke, J. (2009) Yardangs in Australia and on Mars. IAG
Planetary Geomorphology Working Group Featured Image,
Jan. 2010,

http://www.psi.edu/pgwg/images/jan10image.html

Fenton, L. (2008) Yardangs on Earth and Mars. IAG Planetary
Geomorphology Working Group Featured Image, Sept. 2008,

http://www.psi.edu/pgwg/images/sep08image.html

Past images and captions are available at:

http://www.psi.edu/pgwg/images/index.html

Yours,

Paul H.

Friday, 1 January 2010

PDF File of 1851 Paper About "Meteorites" Found in Coal

PDF File of 1851 Paper About "Meteorites" Found in Coal

Paul Heinrich
Fri Jan 1 21:33:54 EST 2010

Dear Friends,

While searching for something else I came across a
PDF file to a paper about "supposed meteorites found
in seams of coal" The paper is:

Binney, E. W., 1851, Description of some supposed
meteorites found in seams of coal: Manchester Literary
and Philosophical Society, Memoirs and Proceedings.
vol. 9, pp. 306-320.

The PDF file can be found at either:

http://tiny.cc/MeteoritesCoal or

http://books.google.com/books?id=5RC9Uf7wdwsC&pg=PA306&lpg=PA306&dq=Description+of+some+supposed+meteorites+found+in+seams+of+coal:+Manchester+Literary+and+Philosophical+Society,+Memoirs+and+Proceedings,&source=bl&ots=nRTd9g4wES&sig=UuWOs1_dJl--xB_SUIqgw5_RNA8&hl=en&ei=0a0-S-n7IYb_nAfVwsz8CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CAgQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=&f=false

The there is the "Fossil Meteorite Project by Pennsylvania
State University" at:

http://www.meteorite.com/psu_summary.htm
http://www.meteorite.com/psu_coal_mining.htm

Also, there is:

"Potential for Preservation and Recovery of Fossil
Iron Meteorites from Coal, Trona, Limestone, and
Other Sedimentary Rocks" at:

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/metsoc97/pdf/5057.pdf

Yours,

Paul H.