Including Original "Paul H. Letters" Copyright © 1996-2017 Paul V. Heinrich - All rights reserved.



Friday, 10 February 2012

Re: obvious single event continental flood debris edge 1 km thick in Gulf of Mexico from S Texas to W Florida: Rich Murray 2012.02.09

Re: obvious single event continental flood debris edge 1 km thick in Gulf of Mexico from S Texas to W Florida: Rich Murray 2012.02.09

Dear Rich,

You need to do your homework before you get carried away
with interpreting what you see on Google Earth. The geology
of the "Gulf of Mexico from S Texas to W Florida" is known
in extreme details from decades of research by academic and
oil company geologists and from thousands of kilometers of
seismic data, thousands of piston cores, innumerable
geotechnical borings, and data from innumerable oils and
gas wells. There is more than enough data and research,
both published and unpublished, to totally refute the below
interpretations and show that the ideas about "continental
flood debris edge 1 km thick" underlying the Gulf of Mexico
is total fantasy. The “oil well cores” and other data show
that the “massive dump of mud, sand, broken rocks, and
km scale pieces of rock wafted right off the lands of North
America -- 1 km thick,” which you talk about below exists
only in your imagination.

Go look at:

Anderson, J. B., and R. H. Fillon, 2004, Late Quaternary
Stratigraphic Evolution of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Margin.
SEPM Special Publication no. 79, Society for Sedimentary
Geology, Tulsa, Oklahoma.
http://sp.sepmonline.org/content/sepsplqs/1.toc.pdf


Buster, N. A., C. W. Holmes, 2011, Gulf of Mexico Origin, Waters,
and Biota: Volume 3, Geology (Harte Research Institute for Gulf
of Mexico Studies Series) Texas AM University, College Station,
Texas.

Galloway, W. E., 2009, Depositional evolution of the Gulf of
Mexico sedimentary basin, In A. D. Miall, ed., pp. 505-549,
The Sedimentary Basins of the United States and Canada.
Elsevier, New York.

Salvador, A., 1991, The Gulf of Mexico Basin. Geological Society of
America, The Geology of North America, Boulder, Colorado.

Best wishes,
Paul H.

----------
---- Rich Murray <rmforall@gmail.com> wrote:
>obvious single event continental flood debris edge 1 km thick
>in Gulf of Mexico from S Texas to W Florida: Rich Murray 2012.02.09
>
>I just looked up some specific underwater landscape SE of
>Corpus Christi:
>
>[ Dennis Cox, who has taught me how to look at many landscapes
>with new eyes, has an eighth grade education, and has been a
>welding inspector in Fresno, California.
>
> http://craterhunter.wordpress.com/ ]
>
>In Google Earth, use Ctrl up-arrow to slant the view to get a
>good 3D understanding of the landscape. ]
>
> 26.261317 -93.778019
>2108 m deep high point, 909 m above level plain to N at
>2999 m deep -- this is where the debris flood surge came to a
>stop, leaving a very similar edge all the way from south Texas
>to west Florida -- it'd be interesting to show what oil well cores
>show about this massive dump of mud, sand, broken rocks,
>and km scale pieces of rock wafted right off the lands of North
>America -- 1 km thick.
>
> 26.115615 -93.341029 2.999 m deep
> edge of massive 12,950 BP debris flood from North America coast, Texas
> to Florida -- the start of the level basin of the Gulf of Mexico --
>
> See:
>
> awesome evidence (Google Earth images, stereo pairs, some videos) from
> Mexico to Canada for 500 km comet rubble pile air impacts 12950 BP
> --Dennis Cox: Rich Murray 2010.01.13
> http://rmforall.blogspot.com/2010_01_01_archive.htm
> Wednesday, January 13, 2010

No comments: