Including Original "Paul H. Letters" Copyright © 1996-2017 Paul V. Heinrich - All rights reserved.



Tuesday, 20 August 2013

Fwd: Meteorite hunter takes £10,000 rock to auction - And a part

Fwd: Meteorite hunter takes £10,000 rock to auction - And a part

In "Fwd: Meteorite hunter takes £10,000 rock to
auction - And a part at
http://www.mail-archive.com/meteorite-list@meteoritecentral.com/msg114325.html
Rob Elliott is quoted:

"Sadly, some journalists don't let the facts get
in the way of a good story!!"

An example of this is the story that I found in the
sidebar to the "Meteorite hunter takes £10,000
rock to auction" on Astro Watch at

http://www.astrowatch.net/2013/08/meteorite-hunter-takes-10000-rock-to.html

In the sidebar, there is a link to "Bosnia
'meteor' intrigues new generation in wake of
Russia strike" at:

http://www.astrowatch.net/2013/02/bosnia-meteor-intrigues-new-generation.html

In this story, a everyday sandstone concretion is
touted as a possible meteorite along the same old
tire claims, i.e. it allegedly being "It was so
hot that it was impossible to approach,” that a
person hears about just about every “witnessed”
meteorwrong.

In this case, this pseudoscience did not come from
the Guardian, but from “The Telegraph” in “Bosnia
'meteor' intrigues new generation in wake of Russia
strike (A mysterious rock at a quarry in central
Bosnia has seen a spike in visitors in the wake of
the meteor explosion over Russia last week.)
February 24, 2103 at
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/9890814/Bosnia-meteor-intrigues-new-generation-in-wake-of-Russia-strike.html

A person would think that before publishing this
story that a newspaper like The Telegraph would
consult a geologist before publishing local
folklore as news. Obviously, that was not done.

In case of both articles, I get the impression that
someone, somewhere, neither wanted the facts to
confuse their readers nor obstruct the writing of
an entertaining story.

Yours,

Paul H.